On behalf of Dickman Law Offices, P.S.C. posted in Criminal Defense on Monday, May 7, 2012

Kentucky students love partaking in fun college activities. After all, college is the time to be carefree and have some fun. Many individuals participate in fraternities, sports or other recreational activities. Furthermore, college often involves a great level of traditions and celebrations. Nevertheless, if student participants aren’t careful, fun can quickly evolve into something more serious.

For example, various members of a college university band are facing criminal charges in connection with the death of a band member.

Specifically, thirteen people were criminally charged for hazing, which allegedly resulted in the death of a college university member. Of the students charged, 11 are facing felonies and two suspects are confronting misdemeanors.

The university had a band member tradition called “Crossing Bus C.” Students would walk down the aisle of the bus while classmates punched and kicked them. In this case, authorities believe that the band member was a sufferer of this practice. He was found unconscious on the bus and pronounced dead shortly after.

Medical reports indicate that the victim’s death resulted from “blunt force trauma” that caused hemorrhaging and left deep bruises on the man.

Many states have anti-hazing laws. In this particular case, the felony hazing charge carries up to six years in prison.

Hazing often occurs when people are just trying to have fun and engage in tradition. Nevertheless, if one participates in an activity, he or she must ensure that they are aware of potential for criminal consequences.

In the end, this case involves many university students–many of which may not be liable for this crime. Therefore, as the band members confront these complex charges, each will have their specific criminal justices protections. After all, one is not guilty until proven innocent. As a result, hopefully, they will each retain knowledgeable criminal attorneys that can assist them with their rights.

Source: New York Times, “Criminal charges for 13 in Florida A&M hazing Death,” Robbie Brown, May 2, 2012